Quick Empowerment Ritual

Want a short and fast empowerment ritual?  How fortuitous, because here’s one for you to try out!

I got the idea after talking with Fr. Rufus Opus and getting a short Hermes contemplative ritual from him.  It was his special kind of mashup between a Trithemius-style conjuration, invocation of a god, and contemplation, which turned out really well.  At the beginning, the ritual uses the climactic line and descriptor of intent from the Headless Rite (PGM V.96) to solidify the magician’s power and authority in the cosmos.  It’s basically a consolidation and concentration of the entire force of the Headless Rite into a short statement of intent, which works pretty awesomely.  It’s not a substitute for the whole Headless Rite, but it works as a shorter version of the Preliminary Invocation.  I’ve gotten into the habit of using it before any major ritual and incorporating it into my morning ritual schema.

If you have it, anoint your forehead and palms with Abramelin or similar solar/holy oil.  Face north, and either raise both your arms up in a Y-formation (generic pose of power) or with the right hand extended in front of you and the left up and behind you (Egyptian fighting pose).  and say the following words of power.  Imagine them glowing across your forehead, with the beneficial sign in the middle.  In Greek letters and in transliterated Roman:

ΑΩΘ ΑΒΡΑΩΘ ΒΑΣΥΜ ΙΣΑΚ ΣΑΒΑΩΘ ΙΑΩ

AŌTH ABRAŌTH BASYM ISAK SABAŌTH IAŌ

Headless Rite Sacred Symbol

Extend the arms out to your sides, palms facing forward, and say the following incantation.  While saying the incantation, feel the words vibrate throughout the cosmos, and feel yourself taking in and incorporating all of existence within you as a king would his kingdom.  I’ve provided the incantation in four variations: Greek text, transliterated Roman, translated from the PGM, and the Liber Samekh variant translation:

ΥΠΟΤΑΞΟΝ ΜΟΙ ΠΑΝΤΑ ΤΑ ΔΑΙΜΟΝΙΑ ΙΝΑ ΜΟΙ ΗΙ ΥΠΗΚΟΟΣ ΠΑΣ ΔΑΙΜΩΝ ΟΥΡΑΝΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΑΙΘΕΡΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΕΠΙΓΕΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΥΠΟΓΕΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΧΕΡΣΑΙΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΕΝΥΔΡΟΣ ΚΑΙ ΠΑΣΑ ΕΠΙΠΟΜΠΗ ΚΑΙ ΜΑΣΤΙΞ ΘΕΟΥ.

Hypotaxon moi panta da daimonia hina moi ē hypēkoos pas daimōn ouranios kai aitherios kai epigeios kai hypogeios kai khersaios kai enhydros kai pasa epipompē kai mastix Theou.

Subject to me all spirits so that every spirit heavenly and ethereal, upon the earth and under the earth, and on dry land or in the water, and every aversion and scourge of God may be obedient to me.

Subject to me all spirits, so that every spirit whether heavenly or ethereal or upon the earth or under the earth, on dry land or in the water, of whirling air or rushing fire and every spell and scourge of God may be obedient to me.

A note on the translations: the Greek text says “…pasa epipompē kai mastix Theou” at the end, which I translated as “…every aversion and scourge of God” but which Liber Samekh reads “…every spell and scourge of God”.  The difference lies in the word “epipompē”, literally “sending upon”.  The term is one of two ways classical thinkers defined an exorcism or banishment.  The first, “apopompē”, just means “sending away”, or a general GTFO to an evil spirit, curse, disease, demon, or harmful spirit.  “Epipompē” is a specific kind of banishing where you redirect the evil influence to another target, e.g. “instead of harming me, go find some whore in the street who really deserves this” or “bring your blessings to me and send away all maladies to the ends of the earth”.  This part about “every spell and scourge of God” means any harm or curse, intentional or accidental, that could possibly have supernatural causes, which a magician would also like to have control over in addition to any other spirit.

De Abstinentia

This past weekend was fantastic.  It started on Friday when, after getting home from work, I went to the supermarket to get a few bottles of sangria.  I ended up coming home with a crate of wine, a crate of hard liquors, mixers, some frozen pizzas, and Chinese takeout.  Admittedly, I got a little distracted, but after my Jupiter conjuration on Thursday I was feeling mighty good.  I hung out and drank with a friend on Saturday, and then did the same with another friend plus plenty of Asian food plus plenty of various and sundry other activities, some of which resulted in well-defined circular bruises on my neck.

Don’t judge.  The Bible says not to.

Well, after that, I was feeling bloated, ill-equipped to deal with normal activities that didn’t involve more eating (and even then, ohgodbluuugh), and just generally salty (yay high-sodium dumplings and pizza).  Plus, the added weight gain was unwelcome, especially since I’ve picked up a few more pounds since March than I care to, and it makes it hard to stay focused on much when it comes to the Work and Art.  So, I decided it was finally time to call myself to a fast and just get it done with.

I had been meaning to do a fast for a while now, but it’s hard.  Between being social and eating out or with friends, working at home with delicious temptation all around me, and coping with the occasional allergy or cold, maintaining a fast is not the most simple thing, and that’s without getting to the more internal things like hunger.  I originally, long ago, tried to see how it’d be like doing a weekly fast, like on each quarter of the moon; it worked for a brief time, and then people kept scheduling dates or wanting to get lunch on those very days; after putting the fast off for one day, I ended up putting them off for two, then just canceling them altogether.  You know how these things go: give the demon an inch and it’ll take a mile.  It’s not hard to work up to a fast, either, even for a day thing; according to Frater MC, one good way to work up to a full fast is by a progressive fast.  Variations on this abound, and some may not apply based on how one already eats.  For me, a progressive fast looks something like:

  • Day 1: no meat, no alcohol, no sodas
  • Day 2: no meat, alcohol, or bread/noodles.  Clear liquids only to drink.
  • Day 3: fresh fruits and water only.
  • Day 4 and onward: water only.

Anyway, after reading the Scribbler’s four day fast regimen, I decided to cut the bullshit and go full-on into a seven day water-only fast.  Technically, I started it last night when I ate my last meal of a handful of frozen dumplings, but I officially began it this morning when I made my statement of intent; I’m counting forward from this morning, then.  Did I warm up for this?  No.  Was that stupid?  Yup.  Is fasting in general stupid?  Often enough, yeah.  That said, I have my reasons: it’s been too long since my last proper fast, I need to start going through some proper ordeals in my life beyond the daily grind, I could do with shedding some extra weight, it’s supposedly good for detoxing the body, it’s a good exercise in self-control and self-restraint, and I want to see the effect food deprivation has on my practice and ability to see things astrally.  Granted, this isn’t for everyone; I’m in good enough health with no interfering preexisting conditions that would give me serious pause for doing a fast like this, and I’m not engaged in such an active lifestyle that this would pose a danger to me.

Ordeal?  Why on earth would I put myself through that?  Honestly, I don’t feel like my life is, well, troubled enough.  Things go well, and I don’t have much to cope with besides tolerating people, and I’m sociable and affable enough to do that fairly easily.  I know that, based on my own self-knowledge and an analysis of my natal horoscope, self-control is definitely among my weakest powers; this will be an opportunity for me to confront that demon of myself and give it the equivalent of a smackdown, especially in preparation for finally getting around to binding the Evil Genius.  Plus, given the multitude of resources extolling the benefits of fasting, I figure it can’t be that bad for my practice.

Since this upcoming week I have conjurations with the angels of Mars, Fire, and the Sun, I figure I’ll have energy and drive enough to get through this fine, though I’m already looking forward to eating (at least gingerly) on Wednesday morning next week.  After that, I doubt a full seven-day fast will be called for anytime soon, though I do like the Scribbler’s idea of fasting once a quarter (say, the beginning of every season, or cross-quarter day?), but we’ll see.  Regular fasting, or at least in the form of calorie restriction and increased moderation, has been shown to be very healthy and helpful in even a normal person’s health; how much more so it might benefit me!

For now, I’m going to get back to my water and Enya to get rid of this headache, which should be gone by tomorrow.  I hope.

UPDATE (5/31/2012): Alright, I’m gonna have to cut the fast down to four days, ending Saturday morning.  After conferring with some medical friends of mine and reading up a bit more, seven days is a bit overzealous without training for fasting (who knew?) and preparing for it by doing a progressive fast (no duh).  Plus, after some family issues came up, I’ll be headed out of town this weekend, which involves the close scrutiny of family gatherings at which it’ll be impossible to maintain a fast in serenity.  Plus, I don’t want to have to endure all those folk on an empty stomach.  I’ll make up for the missed days by doing another four day fast in the coming month, this time by prepping for it.  Even though I’m very certain I can go longer than four days (will is no longer an issue, but the risk of severe hypoglycemia might be), it’s not going to be proper for me to continue this at this stage.  Feh.