De Regnis: Supplies and Objects

Although most of my writing is visible and accessible through my blog and my ebooks, there are a bunch of writing projects that I don’t necessarily intend for public release.  When I was recently going through my old documents folder on my computer, I found a writing project I had intended to be a compendium of Hermetic and Neoplatonic knowledge, guidance, and advice that would serve to document my understandings and work as a textbook unto itself, both for my benefit and any who might come after me.  This project, De Regnis or “On Kingdoms”, got pretty far along before it got abandoned, though parts of it serve as seeds or are outright cannibalized for some of my other works.  Though I have no plans to continue writing this text, I want to share some of the sections I wrote that can act as a useful introduction to some of the practices of Hermetic magic in a modern context.  My views and practices and experiences have grown considerably since then, but perhaps it can help those who are just getting started or are curious about how to fortify their own practices and views.  If you have any views, comments, suggestions, or ideas on the topics shared in this post, please feel free to share in the comments!

Today’s selection will be on the topics of supplies, tools, and objects.

On Supplies and Objects

Although the primary heart of spiritual work with the kingdoms of the cosmos is inherently intangible and immaterial, material goods and substances form an important part of many spiritual paths,whether acting as focuses and stimulants for the body or for symbols for the mind to dwell on to obtain higher meaning. The use of ritual tools, magical items, consumable food and drink, and other supplies has a long history across the world, whether offering alcohol to spirits, use of drums and sacred instruments to induce trances, or creating charms and amulets for loved ones to keep them safe. Although there are effectively as many spiritual types of items as there are mundane items, a few large categories are described below that are important to the magus.

Tools. In the course of magical and spiritual ritual, specialized objects that undergo specific consecration for select purposes are used; these are the magician’s tools. Tools may take the form of simple day-to-day objects, such as pens or kitchen knives, but often are elaborated, decorated, and made special through their form, such as by detailed engraving or anointing with oil. Magical tool soften undergo specific rituals of consecration or blessing, where the tools are not only cleansed and dedicated to ritual, but also often for a specific practice or limited use within ritual. For instance,some ritual practitioners have four types of bladed instruments: a ritual sword to represent the element of Air and the powers of the mental faculties, a utility knife dedicated for cutting material things or sacrifices, a spiritual knife to draw circles or engrave special characters, and a war sword used to represent the planet of Mars for offensive and defensive works against spirits and animals alike. Different traditions use different sets of tools, both for their material purposes as well as symbolic meaning, such as the attributions of the elements of Fire and Air to the wand and the sword. However, common sets of ritual tools often include a wand or a staff, a knife, a chalice, a pentacle, a scrying medium such as a crystal ball or mirror, a brazier or censer, an engraving tool,and so forth. Divination tools and supplies, such as a deck of divination cards or dice, also fall into this category.

Clothing. Ritual clothing is similarly important in spiritual work, acting as another type of magical object. Special clothing, kept and used strictly for magical work, helps the magician in both stepping into the proper mindset for ritual work as well as preserving and enhancing the spiritual power of the ritual and the magician. Clothing should be used at the least for enhancing the atmosphere and decoration of the ritual, but may also be generically used for all rituals. Full sets of clothing, such as robes that completely cover the body, may be used across rituals equally well, or minor trinkets such as rings, belts, or boots that may be worn with different outfits can be equally suitable. Ritual clothing may change between traditions or even between rituals in the same tradition, and may be used for multiple purposes at once. These purposes often include protection,preserving purity, aligning oneself to the spirits or to a particular force, and similar purposes.

Talismans. Not all magical objects are those used in ritual. Indeed, many objects may undergo consecration or blessing to bestow benefits or cause changes without any active use. These items are talismans, items that have been magically empowered to cause change. All tools and ritual clothing may be considered talismans, but not all talismans are tools. Talismans are often used to benefit those who possess them in some way, such as protection from spirits or illnesses, enhancing one’s business, or to attract friendship and love from others. Some talismans are dedicated and consecrated by a particular spirit, such as saint medallions, to bestow the attention and blessing of a specific entity upon its bearer. Some talismans are simply set up in the home and left there, such as talismans for protection or safety in the home. However, not all talismans need to be beneficial;talismans to work harm may also be created, left behind as weapons on an enemy’s property or similarly snuck into their belongings to cause malefic influences. Many methods exist to create a talisman, from devout and concentrated prayer over an object to elaborate ritual and sacrifice.

Edible Goods. Particular foods, drinks, and other edible substances may be used in ritual to great effect, either for oneself or for the benefit of a spirit. Many traditions make food and drink offerings, especially those of fresh fruit, harvested grains, clean water, fresh or sacrificed meat, wine or alcohol, and the like; some traditions have the priest or ritual officiant give the food offering entirely without consuming any of it, while others instruct the officiants to partake of the food after the ritual or during it. Blessing food to contribute benefits, or cursing it to harm those who eat it, is a common practice and easily done, either for oneself or for others, even to preserve the integrity of it over long distances or time frames without other preservation. Foods and drinks with a mind-altering effect, known as entheogenic drugs, have been used to enhance or open the mind up to the revelation of gods and the spirit worlds, but should be used with caution. It is important to never use toxic substances without close supervision or control, especially those known to be fatal if ingested. Poisoning others, likewise, is condemnable and generally punishable by governments.

Other Supplies. Beyond food, drink, tools, talismans, and clothing, many other goods often come into play for a magician. Particular incenses, oils, candles, and altar cloths which may be used for anointing or consecration, or for use in different conjurations or communions with spirits, often forms a crucial part of ritual setup, especially given the elemental association of burning incense with pure spirit. Candles, offering light to the world, are burned frequently and used in great quantities to illuminate the world and the worker with the Light from the Divine as well as to honor, exalt, and offer worship to other spirits. Herbs, resins, powders, and dirts from any number of plants, mines, rivers, or other natural features may also be called for, as may some animal parts such as feathers, fur, or blood. Statues, sacred artwork, or other decoration may be desired for work or altar setup, especially when called for by a particular tradition or to call upon a specific spirit.Collecting ancient or authentic artifacts from a particular tradition, era, or culture can connect one with the practices and people who lived in the roots of one’s own tradition. Other implements,such as railroad spikes, horse bits, broken glass, or wooden boxes may also be required for specific rituals. In essence, any object may be used for spiritual or magical purposes, often in creative or novel ways merely by some ideal or purpose-based link that connects an object to a magical ritual.

Tool and Talisman Care. Consecrated objects, being made holy and powerful, deserve careful attention and care to maintain their power and blessed natures. They should not be handled by other people unless it is permissible to do so or if a ritual calls for it, and should not be handled or toyed with by the magician unless actively in use, and unless the magician is in a state of purity to properly handle them. Tools, though they should be regularly used, should also be regularly cleaned, polished, anointed, and similarly maintained. Incense, ashes, dusts, powders,and other debris should be cleaned up and disposed of respectfully, or be reused with care. Any consecrated object, if it requires it, should be duly and carefully consecrated or undergo a type of periodic reconsecration or recharging. Talismans, statues, and images of spirits or gods should be honored and kept clean or anointed, and should be kept in places of respect or holiness such as altars or temples. Metal objects should be gently polished regularly to prevent rust, tarnish, breaking, or similar degradation. Edible and drinkable substances should be kept separate from other supplies, and should be stored and ingested with respect and contemplation. Consecrated objects and supplies of all kinds are a kind of treasure that deserves respect and honor, being made something more than mere matter; disrespecting these objects is to disrespect the spirits and power that made them holy, which can cause problems or punishment by those same spirits.

A bunch of new chaplets up for sale on my Etsy!

So I got a bit of crafting energy out of my system this past weekend, and after taking care of three commissions, I decided to keep the flow going and made another fourteen little things.

Just a few chaplets.  Yanno, a few.  Three each for the four archangels Michael, Gabriel, Raphael, and Uriel, each completed with a medallion of the good angel, and two chaplets for the blessed dead, each finished with a proper crucifix.  It’s been a while since I made any of these, but I had the supplies leftover from a project I had to abandon, so I figured I may as well put them to use and put them up for sale for some lucky magician, devotee, or spiritual worker to use in their own blessed work.

 

Interested in getting one (or more) of these beauties?  Hurry on over to my Etsy shore and buy one today!  Chaplets like these tend to sell fast, since everyone’s looking to up their devotional game with the powers above and below, so once these are gone, they’re gone!  Of course, if you need, you can always commission me for something special that you don’t see listed; for those, just send me an email and we can work together from there!

De Regnis: Altars and Sacred Spaces

Although most of my writing is visible and accessible through my blog and my ebooks, there are a bunch of writing projects that I don’t necessarily intend for public release.  When I was recently going through my old documents folder on my computer, I found a writing project I had intended to be a compendium of Hermetic and Neoplatonic knowledge, guidance, and advice that would serve to document my understandings and work as a textbook unto itself, both for my benefit and any who might come after me.  This project, De Regnis or “On Kingdoms”, got pretty far along before it got abandoned, though parts of it serve as seeds or are outright cannibalized for some of my other works.  Though I have no plans to continue writing this text, I want to share some of the sections I wrote that can act as a useful introduction to some of the practices of Hermetic magic in a modern context.  My views and practices and experiences have grown considerably since then, but perhaps it can help those who are just getting started or are curious about how to fortify their own practices and views.  If you have any views, comments, suggestions, or ideas on the topics shared in this post, please feel free to share in the comments!

Today’s selection will be on the topics of altars and sacred spaces.

On Altars

Altars are important in the work of any spiritual person, as they provide a focus for one’s work.Altars may be any sacred place where one addresses the gods or spirits, or where one performs rituals or sacrifices at. At its most general, an altar is a dedicated spot that is not one’s own but so that one may work with the larger cosmos. Altars can take many forms, but are most often raised platforms, from the size of large hills to small corner tables or portable boxes. Depending onthe purpose of the altar or its target of sacredness, however, the altar may also take the form of a pit, a cast iron cauldron, or some other focus of reverence and spiritual power. Although all altars express the same idea of a place where one interacts and works with the sacred and the spiritual,altars commonly fall into two main categories based on their primary use: devotional altars for divine sacrifice and operational altars for magical ritual.

Devotional Shrine. The devotional shrine is a place or surface, such as a table or a cairn, where one makes prayers, performs sacrifices, and exalts the Divine. Holy symbols or images, such as statuary or icons, are common at devotional altars, and such altars are commonly decorated or embellished in manners pleasing to the devotee and devotor. Devotional altars may be prepared for accepting sacrifices of liquid, blood, meat, fire, incense, or other offerings as deemed acceptable by both spirit and man alike, or may be simple surfaces where one presents plates or bowls of the offerings to them. Devotional altars may be a single surface with many spirits or gods represented on them, or one may have multiple such altars each dedicated to a particular divinity. Any spirit, force, or god to be communed with or revered should have at least some representation and offering at an altar.It is always recommended to have at least one candle burning at all times on a devotional altar, or at least while one is making devotions there.

Operational Altar. As opposed to the devotional altar which is intended for prayers and sacrifices, the operational altar is a construction specific for the magus to work magical ritual. While supplicating the Divine may be done at the devotional altar, the operational altar is intended for a magician to directly contact and work with the forces of the cosmos directly or through the conjuration and invocation of other spirits. Instead of offering sacrifices, the operational altar typically holds the tools of the Work, such as wands, chalices, candles, talismans, and other such magical goods in order to perform ritual. Operational altars may be used for consecrating, blessing, en-chanting, or otherwise empowering objects to be made into talismans or amulets; for conjuration of spirits and angels; or for other particular magical endeavors such as energy work and healing. The primary distinction between an operational altar and a devotional altar is that operational altars are for one to interact with the cosmos on one’s own, while a devotional altar is for one to interact with the divinities and spirits of it on their own

Altar Care. Whether an altar is intended for one’s devotions or one’s operations, it is necessary to keep altars in good condition. Unless one has the direct suggestion from a spirit, altars should be kept clean and free from debris, dust, and all filth. Old offerings and sacrifices should be removed from the altar when the offerings have been consumed, usually immediately after the ritual or a day or so afterwards, depending on the spirit. Ash, extra herbs and powders, and loose supplies should be disposed of appropriately. The altars should ideally be kept hidden from outsiders or anyone who does not work with them, preferably in a separate room free from pollution and miasma; however,when in public or in a space where guests may be present, covering the altar with a clean cloth used only for that purpose may suffice. Before approaching an altar, one should be clean and purified physically and spiritually. Just as with one’s tools, altars should be taken care of for as long as they are in use. When an altar is no longer required, all its tools and equipment should be respectfully removed, a prayer or working done to officially deconsecrate the space or furniture used for the altar, and the furniture respectfully removed or given away.

On Sacred Spaces

Just as an altar provides a concentrated focus for one’s spiritual activities, larger spaces may also be used for devotion and ritual. While altars may be placed anywhere, they are commonly found in nested levels of sacred spaces, while some sacred spaces have no altars or only temporary ones erected for a specific purpose for a short time. Sacred spaces may be dedicated entirely to one particular spirit or type of working, or may be more generally consecrated for any number of rituals.

Circles. A circle is the simplest form of sacred space, consisting of a closed off area for protection or purity drawn about in a circle. The use of a circle is important, though features outside the circle such as braziers or stands may be in a square, pentagonal, or some other shape. The circle itself is sacred, due to its shape and property of consisting of a single unbroken line. A circle should be drawn clockwise and erased counterclockwise, as a symbolic means to create and remove the circle. Circles may be drawn by tracing a wand or blade on the ground, or may be drawn out in paint, powder, salt, or some other material. The defining feature of a circle is that it is inherently a temporary space, though a fixed circle drawn in something permanent may be reused in multiple rituals. Circles may also be drawn to be pushed out to the boundaries of whole rooms, such as by pointing the wand or blade up at the corner edges of a room in a circle instead of down on the ground.

Temples. Unlike the temporary circle, a temple is a dedicated space for spiritual work. A temple consists of some sort of structure, from a single small room to a sprawling construction complex,which is completely given over to spiritual work. Non-spiritual work should be limited or prohibited in the temple, which may house multiple altars for separate divinities or operations. Though the word “temple” is used, it may be applied to any similar structure, such as a church, synagogue, mandir, jinja, or masjid. Personal or small-scale temples may be set up in a house by dedicating a whole room or a corner of one to spiritual work, often with an altar and keeping it separate from the rest of the house and household activities. Other structures that may be related to spiritual work but not used for spiritual work itself, such as storerooms or galleries for religious art, maybe considered part of the temple if the actual temple space used for spiritual work encloses or is connected to the other structures or rooms. While a circle may be used to interact with the spirits,the temple is often seen to be the home or residence of a spirit. Small temples, such as those which occupy only a part of a room, may often be referred to as shrines, especially when they house some sort of cult image or relic. Oratoria, or prayer rooms, may be considered a type of single-room or part of a room dedicated to prayer and devotional work.

Precincts. Enclosing whole temples, large spaces known as precincts or temenoi are large areas of land and real estate given over to a temple, often including groves, parks, lakes, or other natural features of the land. These are most often reserved for large temples, but the precinct is sometimes the temple itself, especially if a spiritual tradition has an emphasis on open-air rituals such as in ancient Greek rituals. Sacred precincts serve to provide a retreat both in body and spirit to provide an immersive environment separate from worldly matters. These sacred lands may also be seen to provide an earthly paradise for man and god alike, as well as a place where man may be closer to divinity through nature or through meditation in a large area dedicated to a particular divinity.

Space Care. Similar to altars and tools, sacred spaces must be cared for and maintained, though the area covered by a particular sacred space may be difficult to maintain. Any sacred space must be kept clean and free from miasma; regular cleaning and cleansing of the area is good, as is ensuring that all who enter are pure and cleansed. Any who try to enter a sacred space with contrary or ill desires, or with an intent to harm, steal, or defile the sacred space, should be kept from entering at all costs. If the sacred space is not meant to be opened to the public, the space should be locked or somehow protected from trespassers. If a sacred space is created for a temporary purpose, the area should be thoroughly cleaned first in every way before consecrating the area. If the sacred space is dedicated to a particular god or divinity, the blessing and guidance of that spirit should be invoked both for the consecration of the space as well as for its maintenance. When a temporary sacred space is deconsecrated, all the spirits and work there should be honored and all tools, supplies,sacrifices, and work should be respectfully removed according to the wishes of the spirits and gods there; this done, the space itself should be thoroughly cleaned once more and all altars and furniture decommissioned and disassembled in a respectful manner, followed by the invocation of the spirits there to release the area back to the world to no longer be used for a holy purpose. If a sacred space was dedicated to a particular spirit or a particular type of working, workings or worship of spirits antithetical or opposed to that consecration should not be done in that area.

De Regnis: On Spiritual Conditions and Prohibitions

Although most of my writing is visible and accessible through my blog and my ebooks, there are a bunch of writing projects that I don’t necessarily intend for public release.  When I was recently going through my old documents folder on my computer, I found a writing project I had intended to be a compendium of Hermetic and Neoplatonic knowledge, guidance, and advice that would serve to document my understandings and work as a textbook unto itself, both for my benefit and any who might come after me.  This project, De Regnis or “On Kingdoms”, got pretty far along before it got abandoned, though parts of it serve as seeds or are outright cannibalized for some of my other works.  Though I have no plans to continue writing this text, I want to share some of the sections I wrote that can act as a useful introduction to some of the practices of Hermetic magic in a modern context.  My views and practices and experiences have grown considerably since then, but perhaps it can help those who are just getting started or are curious about how to fortify their own practices and views.  If you have any views, comments, suggestions, or ideas on the topics shared in this post, please feel free to share in the comments!

Today’s selection will be on the topics of spiritual conditions and prohibitions.

On Spiritual Conditions

Humanity, as any other class or race of sentient entities, is a complex creature, with complexinteractions that change complex states in one’s body, soul, spirit, and mind. Different interactionscan change the state and condition of a human: just as washing in water can make one clean,spilling dirt or dust on one can make one dirty. Sometimes, these changes are only superficial,but other interactions can induce longer or deeper changes, such as injuries or illnesses. Someinteractions affect the spiritual component of humanity in addition to or instead of the physicalcomponent, and these conditions must be recognized and worked with in order to maintain one’shealth and well-being. For one to work with the cosmos, it is not enough to limit one’s attention tothe self present in the physical world, but to the self that is present and can travel among all worlds.Although there are infinite conditions that the self can undergo, some of the most important and well-known conditions that should be avoided or fixed are defilement, affliction, haunting, stress,and shaman sickness.

Defilement. Just as the physical body collects dirt, grime, and filth that can create odors, illnesses, or other hygienic problems, so too does the spiritual body collect negative emotions, miasma,and pollution that cause spiritual problems. Sometimes these defilements have no physical basis,but they often do, such as coming in contact with something that has a markedly negative impression put upon it. Being defiled can cause spirits to stay away from yourself, and often requires purification of both the body and the spirit, physical cleaning and spiritual cleansing.

Affliction. Unhealthy spiritual conditions that one suffers to their detriment. Often, being afflicted has the result of one feeling “out of step with time”, always at the wrong place or at the wrong time, constant bad luck, constant or chronic illness or fatigue, opportunities being restricted or taken away, or similar. Two primary kinds of affliction exist, crossed and cursed. Crossed conditions are an affliction that one enters into through one’s irreverence, disrespect, ignorance,vulgarity, banality, or carelessness in one’s actions; crossed conditions are often the result of disrespecting or ignoring spiritual prohibitions or taboos, and angering spirits or gods. Cursed conditions are similar, but are the result of someone performing a ritual to explicitly harm the target. Crossed conditions are best removed through appeasing and asking forgiveness of the spirits, while curses must be dealt with and removed on their own terms or by working with the original curser.

Haunting. A condition where a person or place is under constant assailing or infestation by a spirit. Haunted conditions may take the form of obsession or possession. With obsession, the spirit constantly lingers around its target, nagging and annoying or generally causing harm and malignance; this is not unlike being crossed, and can sometimes be a result of being crossed.Possession is when one is dominated and controlled by a spirit, performing actions that the target would otherwise not do while unafflicted. Blackouts and loss of memory, as well as extraordinary physical or spiritual ability, are common indications of possession. Depending on the strength of the spirit haunting the target, varying levels of skill and force may be required to helping the situation,from a simple spiritual bath to a week-long exorcism or more.

Stress. A condition where one’s spiritual and energetic capabilities are fatigued to the point of exhaustion. Excessive ritual without properly preparing oneself, working for long amounts of time without rest and recuperation, and being too close to sources of power can all induce stress or burnout. Physical fatigue, fevers, headaches, hunger, delirium, sickness, and lowered cognitive ability can all be the results of spiritual stress. Proper rest and nourishment are needed to remove stressed conditions, including both physical and spiritual measures. Stress may be an indication that one is trying to attempt too much too fast; more preparation and simple exercises to build up one’s tolerance for spiritual work and power may be required.

Shaman sickness. An idea taken from various animist cultures, shaman sickness indicates that one is called to work with the spiritual world but ignores the call. Unlike simple vocations in the human world, when the spirits call and are ignored, humans suffer. Often, shaman sickness is present in children or young adults who are not properly spiritually raised or who try to shun the spiritual side of humanity, and symptoms can be at least as bad as crossed conditions, if not extreme up to the point of severe illness and death. Shaman sickness may happen to those who have not yet entered into a spiritual path or to those who have left their path entirely; in both instances, one is not performing their cosmic duty and will suffer until they reclaim their responsibilities. Shaman sickness is cured only by beginning or continuing the work given to spiritual workers.

On Prohibitions

Although not an active part of practice, the observation of restrictions and prohibitions on one’s actions is still an important part of one’s work. Just as there are laws in place to keep citizens of a country from enacting criminal deeds, many religions and spiritual traditions have sets of rules,precepts, and commandments to keep their adherents from straying from the path or performing acts antithetical to the teachings of those paths. Such prohibitions may be developed in any number of ways, but the most important and meaningful are those obtained from the spirits themselves, be they a god or some other spirit.

Prohibitions received from the spirits themselves, such as the Ten Commandments given to Moses by the God of Judaism, are usually set in place to please or placate the spirits that give them, or to keep them in an agreeable contract or vow with the people given the prohibitions.Such prohibitions, also known as taboo, are considered of the highest priority and should always be followed. Sometimes, as in the Noahide Laws, these prohibitions are intended for all people whether part of a particular religion or not. In other cases, these rules are given only to individuals for their own well-being and progress, or for the creation and effecting of vows.

Personal vows and ascetic practices, on the other hand, are prohibitions that one puts upon their own self and practice. Oftentimes, these vows are made as a mark of dedication to one’s path or to a particular spirit, such as prohibiting oneself from consuming intoxicants if one works with a god of purification or sobriety, or prohibiting oneself from drinking wine without making an offering of it to a god of pleasure and intoxication. Some vows are purely symbolic or have their basis in a particular spirit’s mythos and history, or are instituted to keep one’s practice in line or from falling apart. Extreme versions of these vows, sometimes known as a geas, implies utter adherence and obedience to a particular vow, with the result of breaking the vow being extreme debilitation, affliction, or even death; such vows are bindings.

Other prohibitions that might be observed, especially those that religions or traditions keep as a whole, often have natural or political causes that require certain rules of behavior to be kept to keep their followers a cohesive group as well as to ensure their practice and existence. For instance,rules to prevent gossip, clarity of speech, not making false accusations, not lying or exaggerating one’s stories, and not charging interest on loans are rules that, although not having a clear spiritual origin, help in other spiritual objectives as well as living a good life according to the ethics and values of a particular path. Keeping a rule of secrecy, not speaking to others of lessons learned, and similar laws of silence can help ensure the existence and sacredness of a tradition, especially one whose lessons are initiations or are mysteries that are kept from the general public. Other rules,such as the kosher food and dietary laws of Judaism, are meant as sanitary codes or similar guidelines to ensure the physical health and longevity of their adherents, which are necessary in order to develop a healthy spiritual life.

These and other prohibitions, though useful, are by no means mandated in the Great Work,depending on one’s path and progress. However, when one accepts a prohibition from a spirit, a group one follows, or oneself, it is essential that one carry out that prohibition. Breaking any rules that one is bound to is nothing good, and one should strive as much as possible to avoid doing so.It sometimes happens, however, that one breaks a prohibition, either with or without the intention to break it; breaking such a prohibition or vow can have no effect or chaotic and ultimately fatal effects, depending on the source and nature of the prohibition. Upon breaking a vow, one should always strive to make peace with the spirit or group that instituted the prohibition, confessing one’s violation of the rule, returning any boon or blessing that was bestowed in exchange for accepting the vow, and making reparatory offerings and apologies to spirits that demand it. Such offerings are dependent on the spirits that require them, so asking them or their priests for what may be required to mend a broken vow or to forgive a violated prohibition is necessary. Sometimes a vow must be broken to prevent a greater vow from being broken, or to prevent a great danger or evil that might befall oneself; in other words, utility can sometimes trump propriety. In these cases,upon breaking the vow or prohibition, one should still go through with the process of atonement and making reparatory offerings.

The purpose of accepting and carrying out vows and prohibitions is to show dignity, uprightness,and constancy in one’s Work. Through these vows, people, spirits, and the worlds we work in can depend on us and trust us with power, knowledge, and spiritual strength. However, by breaking such vows, one can often lose this respect and trust gained from the spirits. This can cause spirits to be less cooperative, ignore one altogether, or actively harm the one who breaks vows and prohibitions;similar results can happen just as easily with human entities as they can with spiritual entities. If one finds a vow too extreme to uphold, it is better to never accept it than to break it later and ask for forgiveness; if one has already accepted the vow, then the recommended practice would be to confer with the spirits or group of people who instituted it and ask whether the vow might be lifted or forgiven, depending on one’s situation. This latter choice, though not as harmful as outright breaking a vow and indicating that one is humble and self-aware enough to recognize one’s own weakness, is not preferable, however.

Prohibitions, vows, and mutual offerings can all be thought of as contracts. If several parties sign onto a contract with certain specifications, expectations, payments, and contingencies, then those parties are considered bound and obligated to uphold the terms of the contract. If any one party breaks the terms of the contract, any contingencies related to the contract being nullified or the specific part violated may come into play; otherwise, the contract may be in continued effect or may be entirely annulled depending on the terms of the contract. Once a contract is broken,there are usually no expectations about what the backlash, if any, might be; this is usually up to the spirits or to the group that institutes it, but are often known well in advance of any contract being signed, and are often part of the contract itself.

It so happens that one may enter into a contract, prohibition, or vow with a spirit or entity, including a person or a group of persons, and instead of the practitioner violating the prohibition or contract, it is the other party who fails to carry out the terms of the vow. For instance, a priest may seek the aid of a particular god for a particular end, promising to make offerings on their behalf in exchange for work done for the priest, but the event and work never come to pass. In such cases, the one who asked for the prohibition is often freed from the vow, since the other party broke it; however, one should be absolutely sure in approaching this matter, and always seek find out why the vow was not upheld or whether such a vow should never have been taken up to begin with. In the case where the vow on a spirit is not upheld, many factors can come into play,not all of which may be under the spirit’s capability. Sometimes, the integrity or credibility of the spirit is called into question; if this is found lacking, another spirit should be worked with